Blackwork progress

Y’know, I was all ready to post a couple blog posts with other things I’d been working on, in some sort of delusion that I was going to have tons of time to work on things other than the 12 months of embroidery project. Hunh. Apparently I am bad at ‘quick’, and life doesn’t pause just because I have a desire to do more projects. So this might be a blog that’s got a whole helluva lot of embroidery for the next while. I promise that I do other things, but they aren’t terribly interesting (or finished enough for photos).

Alright, so February is Blackwork, and when last we chatted about it, I’d chosen my inspiration piece. After some fiddling with the photocopier to get it to a nice size on my 6″ square of linen (nothing fancy, retrieved out of the scrap bin probably from a chemise), the lightbox came into play to trace it onto my fabric. I am not a fancy tracer (and somehow I always manage to screw it up), but micron pen is my godsend here. It’s much easier to do little dots than drag the tiny tip along the fabric, but whatever works for you. (Dot tip acquired from a teacher whose name I’ve forgotten at Known World Fibre in Calontir a few years back. Shout out, thank you!) (While I’m asiding here.. y’know, it’s often the tiny offhanded comments that stick with me long after a class, not necessarily anything about the class material itself. Hanging out with other artistans who do what you do is VITAL.. but I’ve commented on that before.)

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No matter that I’m tracing from a very clear image, eternally my roses are special snowflakes, but still, time pressure is a thing, and so I press on. They are clearly just heritage breed, non GMO roses. Clearly. I decided to do the outline in backstitch, just to be different from the split stitch I did my coif in. The thread is a 60/2 weaving silk that I dyed with cochineal a while back, and after a tight race of votes at an event, the pink won. It is really nice to embroider with, tightly spun and smooth, but not stiff and unyielding. I haven’t embroidered with it before, but I will again (and again, and again I expect in this year).

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Outlines done, now it’s time to fill in some bits. There’s three main styles of fill in coif blackwork. There’s the little seed stitch highlights, there’s the dense geometric fill (The same fills that the modern world claims is the ONLY blackwork, but I rant about that a lot.), and the last fill style is to leave it blank. I decided to do my leaves in seed stitch, and my trio of roses in three different fills, and then leave my little leaves blank. Full spectrum of examples! Most coifs pick one and use it for the whole thing, rather than combining, but I’m leaning into this example thing, so we’re getting the buffet plate.

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When choosing my fills, I knew exactly where I was headed. Over to Countess Ianthé’s book of fills, mostly historical, but beautifully charted and where I knew exactly where to find them. She’s got two volumes out, and all three of mine came from Volume One. I’ve used them before, I have favourites and I got to plunk a few into this sample. I did do them as counted work, over 2 threads of linen, using my shiny new magnifier. By this point, it was only mid-February and things were going great guns, I started having visions of being done in a day or two and getting a couple week’s ahead on canvas work! Life had other plans. I’ll show you braid work next week.

2 thoughts on “Blackwork progress

  1. Delighted you find the thing useful! I would caution that the free Ensamplario Atlantio collections are not rigorously documented, and include lots and lots of material I doodled up in addition to fills I jotted down from artifacts. In part they are free because they are transcriptions of my working notebooks, with no attempt to keep them rigorously “source pure” (As opposed to my Carolingian Modelbook series, which is fully documented.)

    That being said, In Ens Atl II, patterns 15-20 do have a specific and identifiable period source, and I describe it here: https://string-or-nothing.com/2014/01/06/elizabethan-blackwork-smock/

    I do look forward to seeing more of your work. You have no idea what joy I derive from seeing the pattern-children at play, out in the wide, wide world.

    Best wishes for project success! Ianthé/Kim Salazar

    Like

    • For this sampler piece, I was utterly content with picking ones I fancied without being too fussed about being able to document them to the n’th degree. It’s ultimately a teaching / sampler work rather than A&S war point work, and there’s a great many spots where I’ve adjusted, altered and squished to suit the form rather than a strict reproduction.

      Thank you so much for all the work you do! I’ve been following you since the wiseneedle days. 🙂 Take care!

      Liked by 1 person

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